Illustration: Jenny Chen

IN THE EXHIBITION:

a garland for patty by Chelsey Campbell (Laser-engraved Moriki Kozo, Oguni Kakishibugami, and Chiri Kozo tissue on heritage washi paper) 2022

a garland for patty
Chelsey Campbell

Manjas as Mobility Aids by Harmeet Rehal (black milk crates, old saris and dupattas, rope) 2023

Manjas as Mobility Aids
Harmeet Rehal

nadyes _ you come back by Logan MacDonald (Installation) 2022-ongoing

nadyes/you come back
Logan MacDonald

Used Pillowcases and Used Medical Supplies

Pillow Fight
Alex Dolores Salerno

m. patchwork monoceros - waiting in line at the corvid cafe (draft)

In Praise of Voice Notes and Penguin Pebbling (part of Mourning Microcosmmutes)
m. patchwork monoceros

ARTIST TALK

ABOUT THE EXHIBITION

Indebted to the words and thinking of disability justice educator Mia Mingus, wherever you are is where i want to be offers access intimacy as the un-structuring logic for our collective queer and trans crip futures. Refusing the loudly eugenicist mapping of isolation and disposability upon our disabled queer-trans-crip bodyminds, the multi-disciplinary practices platformed here speak with a loved urgency to the ways in which embodied experiences of access intimacy have the capacity to reconfigure time, space, and relation. Spanning installation to textile to video, the work of these artists proposes the act, experience, and feeling of crip kinship as a means and model of radical future-making.

ABOUT THE CURATOR

SarahTai Black (they/them) is an arts curator and critic born and (mostly) raised in Treaty 13 Territory/Toronto whose work aims to center Black, queer, trans, and crip futurities and freedom work. Their curatorial work has been staged at Cambridge Art Galleries (Cambridge, ON), Dunlop Art Gallery (Regina, SK), MOCA (Toronto ON), PAVED Arts (Saskatoon, SK), and A Space Gallery (Toronto, ON).

kind renderings

kind renderings

RWM 2022 Kind Renderings

AN IN-PERSON EXHIBITION

Kindness is not an act of weakness. It is an act that resists societal expectations of doing and saying nothing. This form of rebellion is evident in this year’s Rendezvous With Madness visual art exhibition whereby the six exhibiting artists address within their work personal experiences that challenge what mental health and wellness looks like. Action is apparent through frameworks of compassion, thought-provoking imagery and considerate storytelling.

IN THE EXHIBITION:

A photograph of the back of a head with bantu knots.

CHAINS & CROWNS
Stéphane Alexis

An inverted photo with black background and white swirls of hairs

THE THINGS WE CARRY WITH US
Twinkle Banerjee

Pink cream background with four fem presenting people at the bottom of the page. All four have an image of a naked human running on a hamster wheel. The four figures are looking tired, on their devices and pensive.

LOSING IT
Boozie

Black and white line drawings of multiple linked fish swimming above waves of black lines.

MULTITUDE OF FISH - ACENSION TALES
Jenny Chen

Charcoal drawings of curled bodies surounded by words.

MY LEFT-HAND IS TALKING AND
MY RIGHT-HAND IS NURTURING
Jessica Field

Painted portrait of a park parking lot with a bright light in the blue sky and an ice cream truck with an adult and child waiting for their treats.

CINNAMON
Wen Tong

This year, the exhibition in the Rendezvous With Madness Festival will be presented in-person throughout the festival from October 27 to November 6.

VENUE

Workman Arts Offsite Gallery, Artscape Youngplace, 180 Shaw Street, Unit 302, Toronto 

 

GALLERY HOURS

October 27 to November 6, 12 – 6 PM

 

EXHIBITION OPENING & ARTISTS TALK

October 29, 1-4 PM, Talk at 2:30 PM

After the opening reception, engage with the artists of kind renderings as they delve into their work and  practice.

TOURS

Please join us for a guided tour on Thursday, November 3 at 5 PM 

ACCESSIBILITY

If in-person access is a barrier, please contact Raine Laurent-Eugene at raine_laurenteugene@workmanarts.com

 

Visit the Accessibility page for further festival information and wayfinding.

WORKMAN ARTS MEMBER ARTISTS JURY:

 

Sylvia Frey, Visual Artist, Toronto

Sylvia Frey is a Mad, Queer, BIPOC Visual Artist based in Toronto.  Her artwork explores the intersection of Madness, Healing, and Art.  She is an interdisciplinary artist, working in the mediums of painting, drawing, writing, and performance.  Most currently, she has started to explore film and photography.  Her artwork can be found in various private collections in North America and Europe.

 

Esmond Lee, Visual Artist, Researcher, and Architect, Toronto

Esmond Lee is an artist, researcher, and architect based in Scarborough. Lee explores long-term, intergenerational experiences of migration in peripheral spaces. He holds a Master of Architecture and is pursuing a Doctorate in Critical Human Geography. Lee draws from these seemingly diverging backgrounds to examine identity, belonging, and nuanced cultural and political borders in the built environment. Recent works include installations for Nuit Blanche Toronto, developed during his time as the Doris McCarthy Artist-in-Residence, and at Malvern Town Centre for CONTACT Photography Festival. Lee’s current projects include two photobooks: ‘Below the City’, recognized by the Burtynsky Grant, and one for Woodside Square Library as the TPL Artist-in-Residence. 

 

Laura Shintani, Visual Artist, Toronto

Laura Shintani is a multimedia multidisciplinary artist who’s curiosity leans into learning, leadership and making friends with the interior monologue of the mind. Having a Japanese-Canadian ancestry, she directs themselves to create work that re-connects a disconnected past to the present. She lives with and embraces neurodiversity.

Her work has been shown at the Royal Ontario Museum, Campbell House Museum, Tangled Arts + Disability and Workman Arts. She helps to facilitate CAMH’s client “Art Cart” through Workman Arts and has received grants from and has been on juries for the Ontario Arts Council. Her most recent skill is trying her hand at taiko drumming!

IN(SITE)

IN(SITE)

In(site) Logo

A Virtual Exhibition
In-Site, Incite, & Insight

Rather than experience the festival’s exhibition on-site, this year we experience it “in-site” — in a website, in the digital world, in the virtual. The works in the festival this year have been selected with the intention of being experienced virtually.

The artists bring insight to their experiences of the world having changed, how it continues to change and what this change can offer. This includes our growing awareness around mental health, our relationships with both the physical and digital worlds, and how the works can incite us into action. The exhibiting works investigate these themes and more, providing room to engage with the arts in a time when interacting and experiencing work has been significantly impacted. Through these works, we recognize that we are in the moment, in the current, in the site.

Visit the virtual exhibition here:

insite.workmanarts.com

IN THE EXHIBITION:

Blurred grey smoke-like smudges.

SELF // ISOLATION
Chelsea Watson

Top half of an individual in front of a multi-coloured graffiti filled wall. They wear mixed textiles of red where their face is covered with a chain mail piece which reveals their eyes.

UNBREAKABLE
Amplify Collective

Black and white drawing of a thin lined body of a human figure with a bird head and thin neck. One arm is a wing where both arms hold a cane each. There are two cross-hatched rectangles with dots

HYBRID PRECARITY
Leena Raudvee

Collage of a graph on the left and a handwritten letter on the right in the background, with a figure above walking away, and a headless figure holding a headless child below. Overtop of the letter is a diagram of a body part nearly resembling the brain. Overtop of the letter and graph is a portrait of a headless figure wearing a button up shirt. This is layed over a colourful rorschach implying that it is the head of this figure.

SZEPTY/WHISPERS: DIALOGUE

Man making "shush" gesture to bird

COAL MINES AND TREE TOPS
Dani Crosby

A laptop in the centre, open to a complicated program. In the foreground there are medical monitors connected to a plant. There is another plant on the right and more in the background. In the far back there is a projection of indiscernible plants.

GREEN GAZING
Ashley Bowa & Lesley Marshall

Three video stills ontop of blueprints and maps

HOW WE CARED
Saroja Ponnambalam & Rupali Morzaria

This year, the exhibition in the Rendezvous With Madness Festival will be presented virtually which will be accessible throughout the festival from October 28 to November 7. Work including timed events and performances will be accessible through the virtual exhibition site through the link below:

VIRTUAL GUIDED TOUR

Watch the virtual guided tour of the In(site) exhibition held on Sat, Oct 30, 12 PM ET

SPECIAL IN PERSON FEATURES

  • How we cared video installation will be on the ground floor window of 1025 Queen St W, available 24/7.
  • UNBREAKABLE performance will be presented live on opening night, in the CAMH Auditorium at 1025 Queen St W.

ONLINE LIVE EVENTS

  • Green Gazing invites the public to engage in a movement class as a virtual participatory performance on the final day of the festival.

ARTIST TALKS

ACCESSIBILITY

If either online or in-person access is a barrier, please contact Paulina Wiszowata at paulina_wiszowata@workmanarts.com.

Workman Arts will have available the In(site) virtual exhibition displayed and interactable on a monitor in their front office at 1025 Queen St W Suite 2400.
Available during Box Office hours:
Monday – Friday, 10 AM – 4 PM.

Visit the Accessibility page for further festival info.

David Constantino Salazar: Forever (Bird-Botanicals) @ Gardiner Museum

David Constantino Salazar: Forever (Bird-Botanicals) @ Gardiner Museum

Saturday, August 21 to 31, 2021

Community Arts Space 2021
Project led by David Constantino Salazar
In collaboration with participants from Workman Arts

Established in 2016, Community Arts Space (CAS) is the Gardiner’s incubator for arts-based projects that build community through clay making. As part of CAS2021, artist David Constantino Salazar presents Forever (Bird-Botanicals) in partnership with members of Workman Arts, a Toronto-based arts organization that promotes a greater understanding of mental health and addiction.

Inspired by folk tales and allegories passed on from his grandparents in Ecuador, Salazar uses the symbol of the bird to explore themes of hope, freedom, and growth while reflecting on personal tragedy and collective trauma. Salazar asks us to meditate on the concept of human resilience, an idea especially pertinent as we begin to recover from the impact of the global pandemic.

Salazar created over 200 birds during a two-month residency at the Gardiner. While the clay was still soft, he threw the birds at a wall, evoking a physical, mental, and spiritual rupture, and at the same time preserving their beauty and energy. As the title suggests, the birds endure, albeit in a new form. Salazar encourages us all to approach traumas as opportunities for transformation, adaptation, and renewal, while remaining sensitive to how these experiences change and challenge us.

Appearing alongside Salazar’s work are birds made by participants from Workman Arts who took part in online workshops lead by the artist in July 2021. In contrast to Salazar’s birds, displayed on the gallery walls, the birds created by the Workman Arts participants gather on the ground. The space between these two groupings creates an uncomfortable tension that we are encouraged to sit with rather than ignore.

Additional birds made by community members and Gardiner visitors in a series of hands-on workshops are on view throughout the Museum.

David Constantino Salazar is a Toronto-based sculptor with a Master of Fine Arts degree from OCAD University. He has exhibited widely, including at Carnival, Rio de Janeiro (2012); the Spadina Museum, Nuit Blanche, Toronto (2015); and the first presentation of Forever (Bird-Botanicals) at the third International Biennial of Asunción in Paraguay (March 2020).

Supporting Sponsors

Susan Crocker & John Hunkin

Gardiner Museum

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Re:Building Resilience Exhibition

Re:Building Resilience Exhibition

Promotional image for the festival incorporating artworks and event posters by participating artists. Imagery includes clay fish, from “Multitude of Fish” by Jenny Chen, multicolored blocks from “Alpha Support” by Justin Mence, a mobile titled “Cry Baby Mobile”, by Kassandra Walters, wallpaper-style design from “Post-Part” by Longernin Collective, and a pattern from “Ectoplasms” by Megan Moore.

Re:Building Resilience features 25 installations that examine all facets of mental health issues. This will be our last festival at 651 Dufferin Street before moving to a brand new facility at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health. What better way to say “good-bye” than to animate all 11,000 square feet with performance art, installations, theatre, dance, film and media art?

Tickets and Viewing Options

Tickets for virtual viewing are pay what you wish. Virtual viewing is available throughout the festival. With your ticket, you will have access to a virtual tour that includes a virtual swag bag with extra features from the 25 projects on offer. All ticket holders will also be invited to receive physical RWM swag bags available for free curbside pickup during festival hours.

Please Note: There is one virtual ticket available for the entire Re:Building Resilience Exhibition. Whether you’d like to see one project or all of them, you only need to book one ticket to access everything. The exhibition runs October 15-25, and all purchasers will be sent a link to view the virtual content. Any ticket bought prior to October 15 will receive a follow up email on the 15th with the link.

ACCESSIBILITY

Self-Care Kits are available for free curbside pickup to ticket holders. Kits can be picked up from 651 Dufferin Street between the hours of 12PM-9PM, October 15-25. If pickup is not an accessible option for you, contact justina_zatzman@workmanarts.com for accommodation.

PROJECTS INCLUDED IN RE:BUILDING RESILIENCE

Blurry repeating abstract patterns with thick elongated orange streaks on a yellow background.
Grey K P Muldoon: Mad Carpets - Hotel Carpet Dance Projections
A line drawing of a two-storey house on the top half of the page and a bee with its wings spread on the bottom half of the page.
Saba Akhtar: The Anatomy of a Home
An abstract image of a blue and yellow rectangular block resting precariously upon a brown rectangular block.
Justin Mencel: Alpha Support
An abstract painting of a monstrous figure; its arms are spread and its head appears to be exploding.
Mitchell Clark Meller: Scarecrow
A pixel drawing of lungs, colored in pink and light purple, and outlined in red against a brown background.
Kara Stone: Medication Meditation
A cropped photo of a person in a lacy top with the word “threadbare” embroidered across the chest. Chunky blue-green yarn streams out of their mouth and fills the foreground of the image.
Alexandra Caprara & Raechel Kula: ThreadBare
A multiple-exposure photograph of a crouched nude figure on a black background.
Wieslawa Nowicka: Into the dark of my skin
A backlit circular paper cut image with a series of imaginative scenes involving a sea voyage.
Kristine White: Mad Fairy Tales
A photograph depicting a wire wastebasket in the corner of a room, overflowing with crumpled tissues covered in a smooth, hard yellowish or grayish substance.
Kassandra Walters: untitled (`{`not`}` always like this)
Two still frames from the video “Instruction to the Ball Measure” with the following captions: “The ball measure is designed to assess the intolerance of uncertainty “ and “A ball is a particle”.
Ivetta Sunyoung Kang: Intolerance of Uncertainty
A photo collage depicting a nude person jumping into a water vortex with their arms spread, viewed from above.
Sophie Dow: Mountain Duets
A photograph of a bottom half of a mannikin with a roll of silver duct tape on top of it against a concrete block wall. A piece of pink duct tape on the wall overlaps a piece of silver duct tape, with the two pieces forming an X shape.
Van Lisa: Due to Renovations
A collage-style photographic poster featuring prescription medication in containers, loose pills, notes, and Polaroid photos, overlaid with the text spelling “Prose in Therapy."
Quarter Kid Productions: Prose in Therapy
A photograph of many small hand-sculpted red clay fish laid out on a rocky river bank.
Jenny Chen: Multitude of Fish
Headshot of a person facing the camera with vividly colored stretchy paper strips wrapped around their head.
Laura Shintani: Neuroelastic
Abstract image of blurry, fluid, white shapes on a dark background.
Megan Moore: Ectoplasms
goat(h)owl theatre: Jo, Don't Go There
Post Part
Longernin Collective: Post-Part
A simplified icon depicting a person in a hospital gown hooked up to an IV drip placed within a photograph of a hospital hallway.
Rochelle R: Queen Latifah Give Me Strength
A photographic still life image with an ink bottle, books, a round analog clock with Roman numerals, large transparent bottles containing handwritten messages on yellowed paper, and a quill pen spelling out “Mad Poetry Apothecary” on a piece of paper.
Hanan Hazime: Mad Poetry Apothecary
An event poster featuring a cutting mat, scissors, a ruler, an exacto knife, and a cut up sheet of paper with words “The Collage party”.
Paul Butler: The Collage Party
A photo collage depicting a person, positioned on their back, hanging off the bed in a darkened room. One of their hands points to flaming words “the Apocalypse in Your Bedroom” above them.
James Knott: Apocalypse In Your Bedroom
Photograph of a person mid-somersault on a theatrical stage.
Mike 'Piecez' Prosserman: BREATHE: a dance production on Hip Hop + Mental Health
White logo of a bridge on a dark blue galaxy background.
Pesch Nepoose: The Bridge

ARCHITECTURE AFTER THE ASYLUM

ARCHITECTURE AFTER THE ASYLUM

Mad Building Syndrome

TYPE: EXHIBITION, MEDIA ART

With works by Hannah Hull, Agata Mrozowski, Maria-Saroja Ponnambalam and Rupali Mozaria, ariella tai, Joe Wood, and contributions by Kai Cheng Thom, Joshua Whitehead, and Kelly Schieder

Curated by Sajdeep Soomal
17 January – 22 February 2020
Opening Reception: Friday 17 January 6-8PM

Psychiatry is a modern religion and the asylum is its old church.

Starting in the late 19th century, psychiatrists routinely crafted new disease categories to understand the mad mind: anorexia, hysteria, schizophrenia, depression, gender dysphoria, anxiety. By the 1950s, the psychiatric establishment neatly assembled its shaky ideas about the human mind, diagnostic categories, legal and moral stature, and treatment plans in a holy book called The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM). The manual armed psychiatry’s willful adherents with a gospel to contain and control the insane.

Early psychiatry used both brutal and creative methods of treatment in that old church: incarceration, orgasm, forced labour, Freudian psychoanalysis, insulin shock therapy, meditation, invasive surgery, electroconvulsive therapy. In the 1960s, psychiatry found likely allies in pharmaceutical labs and corporate towers. Joining hands with burgeoning chemical corporations obsessed with maximizing profits like Bayer, Pfizer and Merck, psychiatry added pill-based treatment to its reformist program. Under this new rubric, madness was the product of chemically-imbalanced, malfunctioning brains. And biochemical psychiatry was the solution.

Healthy Responses to Patriarchy

As depression became the diagnosis of the day in the 1990s and diagnostic rates of anxiety sky-rocketed in the 2010s, BigPharma consolidated its hold over psychiatry. It is not incidental that the rise of biochemical psychiatry has paralleled the neoliberalization of the economy. If neoliberal governance in North America reduces the individual down to their productive mind, then contemporary psychiatry and neoliberal self-care functions to sedate that mind into submission. As our minds either shut off or go into overdrive in the face of capitalism, patriarchy, and settler colonialism, we are quickly drugged up with mind-numbing pharmaceuticals designed to pacify us.

Biochemical psychiatry ignores the social, political and architectural surround that drives us mad in the first place. Playing on the term Sick Building Syndrome (SBS)–a medical condition where a particular building’s occupants suffer from symptoms of physical illnesses–Mad Building Syndrome (MBS) is a psychic condition that invites us to consider how our environments make us go crazy.

Healthy Responses to Patriarchy

Mad Building Syndrome (MBS) proposes that madness is the product of a broken world, a normal biological reaction to unhealthy living conditions and toxic environments. The culprits are everywhere: psychiatric institutions run by settler governments, basement offices turned moldy from corporate negligence, family homes ruined by patriarchy. It is an indictment of the built environment that we have inherited and its defenders; an indictment of an Enlightened world designed with the objective to contain and control.

Architecture after the Asylum is a curatorial project about architecture, madness and freedom. Presenting an open dialogue about the architectural forms of asylums, psychiatric hospitals and mental health institutions that flows through sanity and insanity, the project assembles a new set of mad architectural grammars to build a free world. The exhibition features artists, writers and freedom fighters afflicted with Mad Building Syndrome (MBS) who are obsessed with building new, free worlds beyond this mad one.

The exhibition was inspired by the work of Hannah Hull and the vacuum cleaner (James Leadbitter), the UK-based duo behind Madlove: A Designer Asylum. The project imagines what a psychiatric ward would be like if patients designed it. Through interviews and workshops, the duo gathered data about “what good mental health looks like, feels like, tastes like and sounds like” in order to design extravagant, out-of-the-box safe spaces to go mad, and to create a robust guide to designing mental asylums that do not rely on carceral tactics.

As the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) in Toronto gears up to announce the opening of its redeveloped Queen Street location in Toronto and re-affirms its commitment to carceral psychiatry, Architecture after the Asylum builds on the energy of the Madlove project with artists self-diagnosed with Mad Building Syndrome (MBS).

In the exhibition, artist Joe Wood will be presenting their two-part project ᑯᐦᐹᑌᔨᑖᑯᓯᐃᐧᐣ | kohpâteyitâkosiwin – the act of being thought of as contemptible. For one element, Wood marks-up and displays medical documents about her “gender dysphoria” that she requisitioned from CAMH. The public signage can be read sitting from her sculptural installation of tree tops. Through architectural drawing in collaboration with Patrick Richmond and Richard Howard, landscape architect student and Parkdale Community Drop-In Worker Agata Mrozowski considers the relationship between homelessness and wellness against the housing crisis in Toronto. In a multimedia work, filmmaker Maria-Saroja Ponnambalam returns to her uncle Pandi’s story with collaborator Rupali Mozaria, developing an architectural schematic that maps out three key spaces in Pandi’s life: forced healing, natural healing and autonomy. Portland-based media artist ariella tai re-appropriates, glitches, and re-mixes scenes from Gothika against black vernacular queer and trans performances that subvert, interrupt or defy the diegetic cohesiveness of narrative performance that psychiatry demands. Making forays into and out of madness, the works collectively propose new bricks and mortar, new blueprints and new places for building a less-Enlightened world.

Exhibition Public Programs:



Friday, January 17 – Opening Night Reception
Saturday, February 01 – The Visual Language of Psychiatry, workshop by Sajdeep Soomal
Thursday, February 13 – Performance by Joe Wood
Thursday, February 13 – Joshua Whitehead in conversation with Kai Cheng Thom
Thursday, February 20 – Pandi, reflections on the film by director Maria-Saroja Ponnambalam
February 10-21 – Artist Residency with Ariella Tai, hosted by VTape

For further information, including artist biographies, please see Trinity Square Video’s website.

Architecture after the Asylum is generously supported by the Ontario Arts Council.

  • January 17 - February 22
Trinity Square Video

401 Richmond Street West, Suite 121
Toronto, Ontario

ACCESSIBILITY

Wheelchair Accessible Venue

PRESENTED BY TRINITY SQUARE VIDEO IN PARTNERSHIP WITH WORKMAN ARTS
Trinity Square Video

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Artist Talk with Leala Hewak & Laura Shintani

Artist Talk with Leala Hewak & Laura Shintani

Left: Laura Shintani, Bodywashi!, 2019, installation view; Right: Leala Hewak, Clone, 2018, pigment print (detail)

TYPE: ARTIST TALK, EXHIBITION

Join us for an artist talk with Leala Hewak and Laura Shintani, the artists in the Fault Lines exhibition.

About the Exhibition

Acceptance of change and change through acceptance—Fault Lines explores processes emblematic of observant insight and growth gained from conditions of challenge and disruption. It approaches disturbance with openness and optimism and challenges the problematic and commonly accepted ideas about disability and aesthetics. Using altered photographs, video, fabricated materials, and immersive installations, artists Leala Hewak and Laura Shintani mindfully embrace ambiguity through spirited works that speak to lived experiences of neurodiversity and embodied difference. Reclaiming trauma and uncertainty, the artists explore ways of constructively reframing notions of recovery, adjustment, and adaptation. Fault Lines honours how these nuanced investigations of brokenness reconcile in relation to the unique formation of identities, experiences, and ways of being.

Fault Lines is presented by two of the leaders in disability and mental health in the arts: Tangled Art + Disability operates Canada’s first disability art gallery, and Workman Arts is a multidisciplinary arts organization that promotes a greater understanding of mental health and addiction issues through creation and presentation.

Curated by Claudette Abrams and Sean Lee, Fault Lines is a CONTACT Photography Festival Featured Exhibition.

Directions:
Tangled Art Gallery is located in studio 122 on the main floor on the 401 Richmond Building. The closest accessible subway station is at Osgoode Station. The closest accessible streetcar stop is the 510 Spadina Queen Street West Stop (going south from Spadina Station), and the 510 Spadina Richmond Street Stop (going north from Union Station).

Images
Left: Laura Shintani, Bodywashi!, 2019, installation view; Right: Leala Hewak, Clone, 2018, pigment print (detail)

  • May 18, 2 – 4 pm

FREE

Tangled Art + Disability

401 Richmond St W., Ste 122
Toronto, Ontario

ACCESSIBILITY

Tangled Art Gallery is in a barrier-free location. Audio description will be available for the exhibit. We will have ASL interpreters and attendant care present during public engagements. Service animals are welcome. We request that you help us to make this a scent-free environment. The exhibition and related events are free to attend.

IN PARTNERSHIP WITH
Tangled Art + Disability
PART OF THE
Contact Photography Festival logo

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Fault Lines: Leala Hewak & Laura Shintani

Fault Lines: Leala Hewak & Laura Shintani

Left: Laura Shintani, Bodywashi!, 2019, installation view; Right: Leala Hewak, Clone, 2018, pigment print (detail)

TYPE: EXHIBITION

A co-presentation by Tangled Art + Disability and Workman Arts

A Contact Photography Festival Featured Exhibition

Acceptance of change and change through acceptance—Fault Lines explores processes emblematic of observant insight and growth gained from conditions of challenge and disruption. It approaches disturbance with openness and optimism and challenges the problematic and commonly accepted ideas about disability and aesthetics. Using altered photographs, video, fabricated materials, and immersive installations, artists Leala Hewak and Laura Shintani mindfully embrace ambiguity through spirited works that speak to lived experiences of neurodiversity and embodied difference. Reclaiming trauma and uncertainty, the artists explore ways of constructively reframing notions of recovery, adjustment, and adaptation. Fault Lines honours how these nuanced investigations of brokenness reconcile in relation to the unique formation of identities, experiences, and ways of being.

Fault Lines is presented by two of the leaders in disability and mental health in the arts: Tangled Art + Disability operates Canada’s first disability art gallery, and Workman Arts is a multidisciplinary arts organization that promotes a greater understanding of mental health and addiction issues through creation and presentation.

Curated by Claudette Abrams and Sean Lee

Directions:
Tangled Art Gallery is located in studio 122 on the main floor on the 401 Richmond Building. The closest accessible subway station is at Osgoode Station. The closest accessible streetcar stop is the 510 Spadina Queen Street West Stop (going south from Spadina Station), and the 510 Spadina Richmond Street Stop (going north from Union Station).

  • May 3 – June 1, 2019
  • Opening Reception: May 3, 6 – 8pm
  • Artist Talk: May 18, 2 – 4 pm

FREE

Tangled Art + Disability

401 Richmond St W., Ste 122
Toronto, Ontario

ACCESSIBILITY

Tangled Art Gallery is in a barrier-free location. Audio description will be available for the exhibit. We will have ASL interpreters and attendant care present during public engagements. Service animals are welcome. We request that you help us to make this a scent-free environment. The exhibition and related events are free to attend.

IN PARTNERSHIP WITH
Tangled Art + Disability
PART OF THE
Contact Photography Festival logo

BROWSE CURRENT EVENTS

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Making Mad: How Expressions of Vulnerability Connect Us

Making Mad: How Expressions of Vulnerability Connect Us

Featured Artists: Alison Crouse, Peter Dillman, Esmond Lee, Ben McCarthy & SpekWork, Sarah Trad and Véronique Vallières

Curated by Claudette Abrams

Through humour and pathos, the artists in Making Mad explore the ways in which depictions of vulnerability in their work resonate on a human scale. Deep-diving into personal touchstones that go beyond the individual, these works relate in poignant and absurd ways to our condition as a collective of fallible, temporal beings. 

Vulnerability is rarely associated with courage, yet it is central to survival. Happiness and contentment require little consideration—fitting well within our expectations and ideals—yet pain and uncertainty seem to demand justification in order to understand their purpose and meaning (especially in the absence of any explanation). 

The artists in Making Mad unapologetically take cues from their own misgivings to draw attention to our universal susceptibility to harm. They attempt to debunk stigma equated with weakness, shame and isolation, to embrace the compassion, intimacy and intensity of the ways in which vulnerability teaches us to live with an awareness of the likelihood of change.

  • OPENING RECEPTION
    THURSDAY, OCTOBER 10, 7-11 PM
  • October 11- October 20
    daily, 12 - 6 PM
    (closed Oct 14)
FREE
TMAC - Toronto Media Arts Centre

32 Lisgar St
Toronto

ARTIST TALK/PANEL

Saturday, October 12, 1-3 PM

Wheelchair Accessible Venue, Artist Talk/Panel is ASL Interpreted

ARTISTS

Alison Crouse

Devastation Portraits is a series of performative images, staged by the artist, who deliberately collapses face down in public spaces. These overt re-enactments give visibility to the often-invisible weight of anxiety and depression and challenge societal norms of what is considered “appropriate” emotional expression. Alison continues to produce these scenarios for sharing on social media, and they have been featured in BuzzFeed, Metro.uk and on the NPR Picture Show.

Alison Crouse is a Philadelphia-based artist, filmmaker, photographer and instructor. She received her MFA in Film and Media Arts from Temple University and her BFA in Photography from the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design and University of Vermont. Her award-winning film and videos have been broadcast, screened and distributed internationally. Alison Crouse’s photographic work has been published and shown in galleries across North America.

Peter Dillman

45 Homes is a body of work which chronicles the forty-five different homes that he moved in and out of throughout his life with a changing constellation of family members, house mates and partners.  Through the compilation of documentary materials, such as census data and photographs the artist reconstructs and recounts a history of domestic instability from an early age, moving to a more stable environment as he achieved autonomy.

Peter Dillman is a Toronto-based multi-disciplinary artist, curator, theatre professional and instructor. He studied Fine Art at the University of Waterloo, Theatre Design at the National Theatre School, and Culture and Heritage Management at Centennial College. His multi-media work explores themes of home and environment. Peter Dillman’s work has been exhibited across Canada and is held in corporate and private collections.

Esmond Lee

Ancestral Veneration is a photo-based series depicting the inter-generational realities of migration. As a second-generation Chinese Canadian, Lee’s work examines the nuances and ambiguities of suburban cultural evolutions. His layering of familial and familiar motifs on vinyl mesh banner material echo the clash and assimilation of ancestral values with contemporary identities and experiences.

Esmond Lee is a Toronto-based artist and architect. He holds a Master of Architecture (University of Toronto) and Bachelor of Architectural Studies (Carleton University). He has received Toronto and Ontario Art Council grants and is recognized by the Ontario Association of Architects. His work has been exhibited at Gallery 44, Koffler Centre for the Arts, Toronto Media Arts Centre and Artscape Youngplace. Recent projects include participation in the Ontario Heritage Trust’s Doris McCarthy Artist-in-Residence program and Nuit Blanche 2019.

SpekWork

resourced is a VR documentary about the precarious labour of frontline workers. The user progresses through a series of interactive levels, each built to reflect the lived experience of street nurses, social workers, sex workers, and activists; people serving those at the margins of society who are often marginalized themselves through associated stigma and poverty.

SpekWork is a studio exploring new political narratives through game design with a focus on the dynamic relationship between work and play. The studio is a collaborative effort of Cat Bluemke, Ben McCarthy and Jonathan Carroll, post-secondary instructors teaching from the intersections of art, labour and emerging technologies. Members of the collective have been recognized through awards, grants and commissions for their individual and collective work, and supported by Rhizome, the Canada Council for the Arts and the Art Gallery of Ontario.

Sarah Trad

In Sickness and in Health (but mostly, Just in Sickness) is a multi-channel video projection installation which visually shows unnoticed moments between couples and explores the difficulties of seeking companionship while faced with mental illness, codependent tendencies and metaphysical crisis. The title, partly taken from traditional marriage vows, highlights the optimistic decision to bond.

Sarah Trad is a Philadelphia-based artist. She graduated with a BFA in Art Film from Syracuse University, where she subsequently became an Engagement Fellow. She is the recipient of the 77Art Artist Residency (Rutland Vermont Art Center) and Carol N. Schmuckler Award for Outstanding Achievement in Film. Sarah has shown at The Warehouse Gallery (Syracuse, NY), Kitchen Table Gallery (Philadelphia, PA), Gravy Studio and Gallery (Philadelphia, PA) and the Everson Museum of Art (Syracuse, NY).

Véronique Vallières

I Extend my Arms/Je Tends les Bras is a multi-media installation involving a methodically storied assemblage of forms that playfully hinge on spectrums of human experience, spirited dualities and intensity of feeling. Physical interaction with material is signified as curative. Craft functions as a survival tool, patterns as armour, and scale that transforms larger-than-life, gender-fluid, soft-sculptures into delightfully embracing recliners.

Véronique Vallières is a Toronto-based, multi-media artist, working primarily in ceramics, textiles and printmaking. They hold a BFA from Concordia University and have attended residencies in Montréal, Moncton and Winnipeg. As a film curator, they co-programmed monthly film and performance events for the Revue Cinema. Véronique Vallières has received multiple grants for their work, which has been exhibited widely, and most recently, acquired for the CAMH permanent art collection.

MEDIA PARTNER

#GETMAD: JOIN THE CONVERSATION

ARTIST TALK/PANEL
Saturday, October 12, 1-3 PM
Toronto Media Arts Centre

Join the exhibiting artists in conversation with Curator Claudette Abrams as they discuss how their work explores and navigates issues of mental health and pushes back against stigmas.

For Information Contact
Paulina Wiszowata
Visual Arts Coordinator
416.583.4339, ext 6
paulina_wiszowata@workmanarts.com