TRUE

TRUE

Support Image for True
  • October 29 - 30; November 1 - 2; November 4 -5 - 8 PM

CAMH Auditorium, 1025 Queen Street W
Toronto, Ontario

Rosa Laborde / 2021 / English / Canada

On the anniversary of their mother’s death, three sisters are hurtled back in time when their estranged father shows up with a note stating he has Alzheimer’s. Roy hasn’t seen his daughters Anita, Cece and Marie, in years and it’s a visit that is not entirely welcome. But the present Roy is quite unlike the father they remember. This Roy is affable, sensitive, funny, emotional and loving – in total contrast to the unpredictable, often drunk and abusive father of their memories. As they open to the possibility of having him in their lives they are continuously jarred by the sudden trips into the past they are forced into due to his neurological condition. Marie’s husband, Franco, a former professional musician and all-around dilettante, expounds particle theory while playing Mozart and posits the possibility that restructuring their fractured memories could alter the future from that point forward. What follows is a rapid-fire ride through past and present that illuminates the unreliable nature of memory and how the stories we hang onto define us until the moment we let them go. Inspired by King Lear, memory loss in an aging father, the cost of speaking one’s truth, the devastation addiction can wreak on a family, Ikebana flower arranging, piano prodigies and the multiverse theory known as Daughter Universes, the play explores the possibility that rewriting our memories can alter the past and ergo change the future. It is a playful, poignant and piercing look into the nature of memory.

 

Keywords: Addiction | Alcoholism | Depression | Family | Trauma
There will be a 15 minute Q&A with the cast following each performance.
COMMUNITY PARTNERS
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KÍMMAPIIYIPITSSINI: THE MEANING OF EMPATHY

KÍMMAPIIYIPITSSINI: THE MEANING OF EMPATHY

Elle-Máijá Tailfeathers / 2021 / English / Canada / 124 mins

Kímmapiiyipitssini: The Meaning of Empathy chronicles the impact of the opioid crisis on Indigenous community. Tailfeathers focuses on Alberta’s Kainai First Nation, where her mother, Dr. Esther Tailfeathers, works tirelessly to support and educate families affected by the overdose epidemic. The film presents viewers with a series of first-hand accounts from local first responders, healthcare professionals, and people with substance-use disorder.

Kímmapiiyipitssini is a Blackfoot word for empathy and kindness. The Meaning of Empathy explains why embracing this practice is critical to combating addictions. Criminalizing drug use does not address the root problem; a legacy of colonialism and intergenerational trauma inflicted by racist government policies. The film reveals the merits of this new approach, even as it faces resistance from conservative policymakers. Tailfeathers has crafted one of the year’s most powerful films, chronicling the Kainai First Nation’s struggles, while honouring their strength and resilience.

 

SCREENING WITH JOE BUFFALO
Amar Chebib| 2020 | Canada | English | 16 min
Joe Buffalo is a prolific Indigenous skateboarder. He’s also a survivor of Canada’s notorious Indian Residential School system. Following a traumatic childhood and decades of addiction, Joe must face his inner demons to realize his dream of turning pro.

 

JOIN THE CONVERSATION: DISCUSSING EMPATHY

Join us at 8:30 pm ET for a live Zoom panel discussion featuring Dr. Tailfeathers and Lori Eagle Plume, who will discuss the idea of empathy being a powerful tool for combatting addiction; conversation moderated by Alexandra Lazarowich.

Alexandra Lazarowich is an award-winning Cree filmmaker from northern Alberta. Her short film Fast Horse was honoured with The Special Jury Prize for Directing at the 2019 Sundance Film Festival. Her body of work as director and producer includes LAKE, Indian Rights for Indian Women, Cree Code Talker and Empty Metal. She is the series producer for the CBC’s multi-award-winning comedy documentary series Still Standing and is one of the co-founders of COUSIN Collective.

 

Keywords: Addiction | Displacement | Harm reduction | Healthcare | Indigenous rights | Trauma
OPENING NIGHT
Thursday October 28th
5pm (in-person) 
*$25 ticket includes RECEPTION, FILM , PANEL DISCUSSION AND AMPLIFY PERFORMANCE
IN-PERSON SCREENING and panel discussion + AMPLIFY
October 28
VIRTUAL SCREENING and panel discussion
October 28 – November 7
ACCESSIBILITY
COMMUNITY PARTNERS
Toronto Indigenous Harm Reduction
Imagine Native
"Opening Film."

JACINTA

JACINTA

WATCH ONLINE
Oct 29 – Nov 7 available across Canada

LIVE VIRTUAL Q&A – ZOOM
October 30th, 7:30 PM ET

ACCESSIBILITY

Jessica Earnshaw / 2020 / English / USA / 105 mins / Canadian Premiere

Filmed over the course of three years, this documentary begins at the Maine Correctional Center where Jacinta, 26, and her mother Rosemary, 46, are incarcerated together, both recovering from drug addictions. As a child, Jacinta became entangled in her mother’s world of drugs and crime and has followed her in and out of the system since she was a teenager. This time, as Jacinta is released from prison, she hopes to maintain her sobriety and reconnect with her own daughter, Caylynn, 10, who lives with her paternal grandparents. Despite her desire to rebuild her life for her daughter, Jacinta continually struggles against the forces that first led to her addiction. With unparalleled access and a gripping vérité approach, director Jessica Earnshaw paints a deeply intimate portrait of mothers and daughters and the effects of trauma over generations.

 

SCREENING WITH VERY PRESENT
Conor McNally | 2020 | Canada | 5 min | English
How does prolonged confinement shape our experience of time? Filmmaker Conor McNally explores the question in the company of his brother Riley, a young man who’s learning to cope with a new—yet strangely familiar—reality.

 

 

JOIN THE CONVERSATION: Q&A with Jessica Earnshaw

Join us at 7:30 PM ET on October 30th for a live Zoom Q & A with the director of Jacinta, Jessica Earnshaw.
Conversation moderated by Orev Reena Katz.
Orev’s prison practice centred around harm reduction, mental health support and trauma-informed care. As a queer Chaplain, Orev has been blessed to work with all kinds of fabulous, spiritual people, and to support 2SLGBTQQIA people of all sexual and gender expressions in their particular struggles on The Inside. See https://www.orevreenakatz.ca/ for details.
Keywords: Addiction | Family | Generational Trauma | Prison Industrial Complex
COMMUNITY PARTNERS
Pasan
Elizabeth Fry Toronto

LUGINSKY

LUGINSKY

WATCH ONLINE
Oct 29 – Nov 7 available across Canada

VIRTUAL PANEL DISCUSSION
Tues, Nov 2, 8 PM ET

ACCESSIBILITY

ASL and Open Captions

Haiena / 2020 / Japanese with English subtitles / Japan / 63 mins / North American Premiere

Winner of the Cinema Fan Award at the 2020 PIA Film Festival at the National Film Archive of Japan, Luginsky is an incredibly unique animated film replete with early and modern computer graphics, still photography and a collage of cut-outs, which are dizzyingly utilized to maximum effect to tell a story which seems as delirious as the protagonist. The main character of the film is named Deerman, whose head is a deer and who recently endured an accident resulting in chronic hallucinations. Deerman has recently lost his job, and in a series of events that led him to become reliant on alcohol, frequently is beaten up as a result of his drunken behaviours. His addiction takes an even worse turn when he stumbles upon a panther-barmanpriest who creates a forbidden cocktail for Deerman designed by an ex-boxer named Luginsky that alters his life even further with so-called reality and fantasy dancing in unprecedented ways. A most unique film of fantastical visions you won’t soon forget.

JOIN THE CONVERSATION: Q&A WITH DIRECTOR HAIENA
Please join film artist Haiena for a virtual Q&A to discuss his experience creating the unique
animated reality of Luginsky. The discussion will be moderated by animator animator Jeff Chiba
Stearns with Japanese to English interpretation, ASL interpretation and captioning.

 

Keywords: Addictions | Alcoholism | Animation | Class | Surrealism
COMMUNITY PARTNERS
TAIS_logo
japan-foundation-logo

NORTH BY CURRENT

NORTH BY CURRENT

WATCH ONLINE
Oct 29 – Nov 7 available across Canada

PRE-RECORDED VIRTUAL Q&A
Available with the film

ACCESSIBILITY

Angelo Madsen Minax / 2021 / English / USA / 76 mins / Canadian Premiere

After the inconclusive death of his young niece, filmmaker Angelo Madsen Minax returns to his rural Michigan hometown to make a film about a broken criminal justice system. Instead, he pivots to excavate the depths of generational addiction, Christian fervor and trans embodiment. Lyrically assembled images, decades of home movies and ethereal narration form an idiosyncratic and poetic undertow that guide a viewer through lifetimes and relationships. Like the relentless Michigan seasons, the meaning of family shifts, as Madsen Minax, his sister and his parents strive tirelessly to accept each other. Poised to incite more internal searching than provide clear statements or easy answers, North By Current dives head-first into the challenges of creating identity, the agony of growing up and the ever-fickle nuances of family.

“For me, a personal, first-person approach to storytelling was the only way to make North By Current. My own voice is the only one I feel capable of representing. This merger of personal and political storytelling became an opportunity for my family members and myself to converse, collaborate, and create together — our own version of transformative justice.” — Angelo Madsen Minax

 

JOIN THE CONVERSATION: Q&A WITH ANGELO MADSEN MINAX
Watch a pre-recorded Q&A with the filmmaker Angelo Madsen Minax about his experience creating the deeply intimate personal documentary North By Current. The discussion is moderated by Mike Hoolboom, a filmmaker and writer who lives in Toronto and director of Rendezvous 2020 opening film Judy Versus Capitalism.

 

Keywords: Addictions | Family | Gender | Religion | Trauma
COMMUNITY PARTNERS
Inside Out
The 519

THE TESTAMENT OF OLIVER

THE TESTAMENT OF OLIVER

Man looking at empty cans

WATCH ONLINE
Oct 29 – Nov 7 available across Canada

VIRTUAL Q&A
Thurs, Nov 4, 7:30 pm ET

ACCESSIBILITY

Jessica Nilsson / 2019 / Danish with English Subtitles / Denmark / 58 mins / North American Premiere

Every now and then, a film comes along that rips out your heart and shreds it to pieces. Director Jessica Nilsson’s staggering documentary The Testament of Oliver chronicles her friendship with Oliver Juvonen-Peel. Oliver has schizophrenia and struggles with alcohol use disorder. He drinks to cope with his psychiatric issues, but his dual diagnosis makes it challenging to find effective treatment. He reveals
to the camera that mental health facilities reject him due to his alcohol abuse, and he’s involuntarily discharged from outpatient clinics because he’s mentally ill.

The Testament of Oliver reveals what happens to the people who fall through the cracks of the healthcare system. Nilsson’s documentary offers a raw and hardhitting account of a man in dire need
of specialized treatment and support systems. Nilsson captures her dear friend’s struggles with an unflinching eye, sharing Oliver’s soaring highs and crushing lows on his arduous road to recovery.

 

JOIN THE CONVERSATION: Q&A WITH JESSICA NILSSIN & OLIVER JUVONEN-PEEL
Join us for a virtual conversation with the director and subject of the film The Testament Of Oliver. Discussion moderated by Victor Stiff member of the Toronto Film Critics Association and Rendezvous’ film programming committee.

 

Keywords: Addiction | Schizophrenia | Recovery
COMMUNITY PARTNER
Jayu

IF YOU ASK ME - Youth Shorts Program

IF YOU ASK ME - Youth Shorts Program

Chelsy Althea, Kasia Beloussov, Alissa Dawn, Angela Feng, Béatrice Langlois-Bettez, Vyom Malhotra, Maud Mostly, Maneesa Veerave, Muchen Zhou / 2021 / Canada / 60 mins

For the fifth consecutive year, If You Ask Me (IYAM) has supported emerging filmmakers with mental
health and/or addiction experiences to create new work. This year’s program features nine shorts by
filmmakers from across Canada.

These new films were developed in summer 2021 under the guidance of Helena Morgane and IYAM alumni and mentors Malaika Athar, Hanna Donato, Samyuktha Movva, and Shubhi Sahni. Over three
months, filmmakers have strengthened their knowledge of film in the company of peers and industry
guests. Rendezvous is excited to screen these distinctly personal works created during extraordinary circumstances.

 

JOIN THE CONVERSATION: FILMMAKING NOW
The world has changed substantially since the initial planning of If You Ask Me 2021. This year’s
cohort of filmmakers adapted their practices to ever-changing conditions. Join the Q + A session
to learn how recent events informed the production of their films and hear their predictions on
how this time will shape the future of film.

 

Keywords: Addiction | Trauma | Youth

IN PERSON SCREENING
Sun, Oct 31, 5 PM

WATCH ONLINE
Oct 29 – Nov 7 available across Canada

IN PERSON + VIRTUAL
PANEL DISCUSSION
Sun, Oct 31, 6-7 PM ET

SUPPORTER
Aubrey & Marla Dan Foundation
COMMUNITY PARTNERS
Toronto Youth Shorts
Trinity Square Video

Hot Docs Ted Rogers Cinema: His Name is Ray

Hot Docs Ted Rogers Cinema: His Name is Ray

We are excited to co-present the program His Name is Ray with Hot Docs Ted Hot Rogers Cinema.

In his anticipated follow-up to Transformer, which took home the Rogers Audience Award for Best Canadian Documentary at Hot Docs 2018, acclaimed director Michael Del Monte gives a human face to our growing homelessness and opioid crises. Ray once had everything. A job that he loved with the Canadian Coast Guard. The husband to a wife. The father to a family. But his heroin addiction took it all away. Now, the former sailor lives on the streets of Toronto with an entire population that seems to have just fallen through the cracks. Who was he? How did he end up there? With a remarkably compassionate and intimate lens, Del Monte follows Ray on his precarious journey to get off the streets and back on the water, where — in the ultimate achievement of the oblivion he craves — he could just sail away from it all.

+ Screening also includes a special recorded epilogue featuring Ray and Q&A with Michael Del Monte (Director), Scott Montgomery (Writer/Producer) and Hanan Townshend (Composer), moderated by Hot Docs programmer, Aisha Jamal.

FREE PANEL DISCUSSION: HOMELESSNESS IN THE TIME OF COVID

A promotional image. To the centre left is a photo of Dr. Naheed Dosani in a circle. overlapping the circle from the upper left corner is the Hot Docs logo. in the background on the right side is a still from the film His Name is Ray. Underneath is white text on a band of black that says "Free Panel Discussion"

On Wednesday, May 26 at 7:30 PM (EST), we hosted a free live panel Homelessness in the Time of COVID in conjunction with the screening of His Name is Ray. The talk wae moderated by Dr. Naheed Dosani, a palliative care physician who cares for homeless and vulnerably housed individuals with dignity and compassion. The recording of the talk is not available for streaming. Click here for more info or to view the panel discussion.

Panelists

Dr. Naheed Dosani (Moderator) is a palliative care physician who cares for homeless and vulnerably housed individuals. He’s a Lecturer at the University of Toronto & lead physician of Palliative Education And Care for the Homeless (PEACH). During COVID19, he has served as Medical Director for the Region of Peel’s COVID19 Isolation/Housing Program.

Michael Del Monte (Panelist) is a documentary filmmaker and the Director of His Name Is Ray. His film Transformer won both the Audience Award and the Emerging Canadian Filmmaker Award at the 2018 Hot Docs Festival.

Akia Munga (they/them) (Panelist) is a harm reduction worker, activist and consultant.

Jesse Upton Crowe (they/them) (Panelist) is an affordable housing advocate, musician and hairstylist who works with the Encampment Support Network (ESN) in Toronto’s Parkdale.

Jennifer (she/her) (Panelist) is a 50-year-old disabled, queer woman & artist currently trying to survive the shelter system. Happiest when living amongst the bees & trees.

Hot Docs logo

BROWSE CURRENT EVENTS

CHANNEL 2400

6 NOVEMBER 2021 - ONGOING

FILMLIVE PANEL/Q&A

Mental Health Film Series - Rat Park

Mental Health Film Series - Rat Park

D: Shawney Cohen / 2019 / RATING: 14A / Canada / 82 min / FREE

GENRE: DOCUMENTARY

TOPIC: ADDICTION

TYPE: FILM

In the lead-up to the annual Bell Let’s Talk Day on January 28, we’re showcasing free docs-and-conversations about mental health and mental illness in partnership with Bell Let’s Talk and Hot Docs.

Films will be available to stream from January 4-28 and culminate in a live virtual panel discussion with special guests on January 28. Tickets for all films and the panel discussion are free, and can be booked through the Hot Docs Box Office.

In 1978, Canadian psychologist Bruce K. Alexander conducted a radical psychological experiment involving rats and heroin that would revolutionize the way we understand addictions. Thirty years later, this timely and conversation-worthy VICE doc connects the long-forgotten “Rat Park” findings with three stories taking place 10,000 miles apart—revealing why addiction is not really about the drug themselves, it’s about the environments we live in.

CO-PRESENTERS
Hot Docs logo
Bell Let's Talk

BROWSE CURRENT EVENTS

CHANNEL 2400

6 NOVEMBER 2021 - ONGOING

FILMLIVE PANEL/Q&A

Neuroelastic

Neuroelastic

THIS PROJECT IS PART OF THE RE:BUILDING RESILIENCE EXHIBITION.

Headshot of a person facing the camera with vividly colored stretchy paper strips wrapped around their head.

Creator: Laura Shintani / A/V: Grant Padley

Neuroelastic is a self-activated artistic performance. Taking a cue from the well-known concept of Dr. Norman Doidge’s neuroplasticity, it is inspiring that the mind can adapt in new ways. The artist imagined an idea; by wrapping oneself in streams of coloured synaptic “bandages” this symbolic act can allow thoughts and feelings to show on the outside. Using photography as documentation, a capture of the moment reveals what is hidden. This artwork of self-permission reflects on not only the unseen being seen, but that it can be changed. This collection of images I hope can read as a zany family album of the mind. Neuroelastic is an interior selfie and an invitation to an altered way of being.

Laura Shintani is a Toronto-based multimedia artist who creates work in order to provoke questions in artistic forms. Shintani represents a hybrid of work, art making, study and teaching. She is interested in seeing people embrace the cycle of creativity: playing, problem solving and reflecting. Raised in small-town Ontario, Shintani later studied fashion design at Ryerson University and received a degree from the University of Toronto. After personal discovery she made art a vocation and earned a Master of Fine Art from the University of Windsor. Shintani’s most significant exhibition was at the Royal Ontario Museum in 2019.

This artist has interactive materials which will be provided in the RWM swag bag in order to interact with their virtual content. All ticket holders will be invited to receive RWM swag bags available for free curbside pickup during festival hours.

Images of the Neuroelastic installation in Re:Building Resilience:

Photos by Henry Chang

Please Note: There is one virtual ticket available for the entire Re:Building Resilience Exhibition. Whether you’d like to see one project or all of them, you only need to book one ticket to access everything. The exhibition runs October 15-25, and all ticket purchasers will be sent a link to view the virtual content. Any ticket bought prior to October 15 will receive a follow up email on the 15th with the link.

ACCESSIBILITY

Self-Care Kits are available for free curbside pickup to ticket holders. Kits can be picked up from 651 Dufferin Street between the hours of 10AM-9PM, October 15-25. If pickup is not an accessible option for you, contact justina_zatzman@workmanarts.com for accommodation.